Teenage pressure by boyfriends to get on the pill is unacceptable

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The reason why he wants you on the pill may differ, for example, he disapproves of condoms and requests you to be on the pill so he can stop wearing them.

The reason why he wants you on the pill may differ, for example, he disapproves of condoms and requests you to be on the pill so he can stop wearing them.

Taking birth control becomes a safety net not exclusive to avoiding pregnancy but in a mental way as well. Taking the pill will create a new mindset of relief. Your mind trust that the medication will avoid pregnancy, and relieves concerns during intimacy. No need to worry about condoms breaking or wearing them at all when you are with your partner—thanks to the magical pill.

Men do not have the right to discuss birth control. It is a women’s decision whether she wants to risk taking the side effects to obtain the safety net. Men do not get to choose. They are oblivious of the side effects that comes from the magical pill. They are unaware of the push of hormones, the weight gain, and mood swings. They are not the one facing the side effects. Men cannot demand or question us if we are on the pill, or why or why not we are taking it. It is easy for them to say, “I want you on the pill” not having to deal with the consequences. It is a women’s decision for which she should not be judged on. Guttmacher Institute states that “four of every five sexually experienced women have used the pill.” Usage of the pill is rising, and there should be no questions or judgments behind that statement. Taking the pill is more than avoiding pregnancy, it allows you to skip irregular periods as well as avoiding break outs.

I’ve learned that birth control puts your mind at ease. I used to have daily scares when my body would feel odd and I would automatically think that I was pregnant when in fact, I was experiencing the side effects of the pill.

A woman experiences not only the side effect of the pill but also the judgment that comes from taking them. Picking up your birth control is a long process that leads to feelings of judgment. Making an appointment to talk about your sexual preference and your sexual life is uncomfortable. Leaving the doctors room holding that white bag containing your new prescription, many times, makes a woman ashamed.

According to the Guttmacher Institute, “Nine percent of pill users in 2006–2008 (762,000 women) had never had sex and used the method almost exclusively for non-contraceptive reasons.” The decision does not have to be about sex, it is a personal decision about what is best for your body and mental health. A teenage girl can make the decision to take the magical pill on her own.