Voting on California propositions

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This coming November we have 18 California propositions to consider before casting a vote. This means that there are many areas that we as voters need to look at without blindly voting from what we see on television, flyers and billboards. Many of these propositions affect every community, whether it is changes in law, tax or way of life and deserve special attention. There are also some that concern government accountability and campaign financing.

This coming November we have 18 California propositions to consider before casting a vote. This means that there are many areas that we as voters need to look at without blindly voting from what we see on television, flyers and billboards. Many of these propositions affect every community, whether it is changes in law, tax or way of life and deserve special attention. There are also some that concern government accountability and campaign financing.

Probably all of them have at least some dissention in outcome, but several of them will be highly contested from both sides of the agenda. These propositions need to be studied carefully. Our current system is twisted in writing to where many voters wind up voting for something they do not agree with, but the language is confusing.

We will be deciding on whether or not the regulation of gun sales is necessary, or a violation of the Second Amendment. There is a strong possibility that marijuana could be legalized, taken out of the black market and put into our business sectors. Will we repeal the death penalty, ban plastic bags, and extend personal income taxes? These are just a few of the things that we need to decide before November comes around because Propositions are not an easy thing to navigate.

It is essential to understand what each Proposition, both state-wide and local, does and how it affects our communities and our pockets, or in many cases, such as educational bonds, our children’s financial future. Here’s what we are looking at state-wide.

Prop 51 authorizes issuance and sale of $9 million in bonds for education and schools. Prop 52 requires voter approval of changes to the hospital fee program. Prop 53 requires voter approval for projects that cost more than $2 billion funded by revenue bonds. Prop 54 prohibits the legislature from passing any bill until it has been in print and published on the Internet for 72 hours prior to vote. 

Prop 55 extends personal income tax increases on incomes over $250,000 Prop 57 increases the parole chances for felons of non-violent crimes. Prop 58 repeals Prop 227, allowing bilingual education in schools. Prop 59 can determine if a corporation has the same constitutional rights as human beings. 

Prop 62 repeals the death penalty and Prop 63 tackles gun control, while California decides if the selling of marijuana remains a crime or a business. Many of these Propositions work together, making it more difficult, not only to fully understand, but to make an educated vote.

At the surface, I have many opinions on several of these issues, but they will be educated decisions, not rash ones. I am very interested in which Propositions you believe deserve the highest scrutiny and why. Contact me at (619) 441-0400 or email me at editor@eccalifornian.com and give me your ideas. In the end, we might not agree, but we will have begun the needed conversation.

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