Summers Past Farms a unique destination

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Since 1992, when Marshall and Sheryl Lozier first opened Summers Past Farms, it has been the go-to place for people who want a little bit of country.

“We are enjoying the benefits of our business,” said Sheryl. “We have gotten to know our customers and so many of them have become our friends.”

And they are here to stay. A few years ago the Loziers put the property up for sale. They thought maybe they could move on.

Since 1992, when Marshall and Sheryl Lozier first opened Summers Past Farms, it has been the go-to place for people who want a little bit of country.

“We are enjoying the benefits of our business,” said Sheryl. “We have gotten to know our customers and so many of them have become our friends.”

And they are here to stay. A few years ago the Loziers put the property up for sale. They thought maybe they could move on.

“But after three years on the market, nobody was buying it. We have five acres here and it’s all commercially zoned, so I imagine people did not want to put such a great investment in it,” Sheryl said.

The Loziers have decided to stay at Summers Past Farms as long as they can. Their goal from the beginning had been to create a unique country destination.

“We’ve got the reputation for it here. This is who we are,” said Sheryl.

In more ways than one, Summers Past Farms is home to the Loziers. “I was born and raised right here on this property,” Marshall said.

On Dec. 3 people flocked to the 25th annual Craft and Antique Fair, held three times a year. Many of the Loziers’ friends have been repeat vendors over the years.

“People feel like we are the base of the community out here. It’s why we have our coffee bar, so people can sit and visit,” she said.

With their renewed decision to stay, the Loziers have eased into a more relaxed routine. Their hours will be adjusted according to the season. Sheryl will continue to do what she loves best: pick florals and herbs from the garden and arrange them into wreaths and bouquets.

“I like to get up in the morning and get out outside and start foraging. All sorts of flowers and plants can be used, even pickings from that jade plant over there. I love living among all these plants,” Sheryl said.

Another of Sheryl’s passions is soap making, one of the most popular classes that she teaches.

“My background is in cooking — I used to cook professionally on a yacht and at the Sheraton Hotel, so the blending and mixing that goes into soap-making reminds me of creating recipes,” she said.

Marshall is enjoying a more laid-back quality to his work these days. He takes the time to visit with the people who come for coffee and pastries at the coffee bar.

He keeps up on the gardening and landscaping of the property. “Like everyone else, we’ve been worried about the drought. People still appreciate what we are able to do here, keeping our plants going with a minimum of water,” he said.

Marshall has always had an eye for the trees that would look and do well on the property, while Sheryl has good insight for the herbs and flowering plants. 

When the Loziers first bought the property from his brothers, they moved into the cottage that is still there now. They added the pretty archway that everyone likes to photograph. “The wood is from a dead tree from the Cuyamacas. We like to reuse and recycle things,” he said.

In 1987, when they first moved into the cottage and began planning for what they wanted in their life together, there was not a single plant on the property except for the vegetable garden left behind by his mother.

“This place is the result of a lot of dreaming and planning. I designed and built the barn myself. I’ve had careers that paid me more money, but it’s so important to find that balance in life, to make sure that there is pleasure in it,” he said.

For information on hours as well as classes and special events call (619) 390-1523 or go to www.summerspastfarms.com.

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