Churches use community garden to grow neighborhood

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St. Albans Episcopal and First Presbyterian of El Cajon, how does your garden grow? Becky Hurt, assistant to Pastor Dr. Steve Locke, First Presbyterian Church.

A joint venture of the two churches, the garden is located on Highland Avenue, south of the center of El Cajon, and Hurt said out that the growing began in February.

An unused lot next to St. Albans, the garden is a venture to provide a sense of neighborhood, a pulling together of city farmers with a practical ending of providing vegetables to the member farmers and to El Cajon’s refugee population.

St. Albans Episcopal and First Presbyterian of El Cajon, how does your garden grow? Becky Hurt, assistant to Pastor Dr. Steve Locke, First Presbyterian Church.

A joint venture of the two churches, the garden is located on Highland Avenue, south of the center of El Cajon, and Hurt said out that the growing began in February.

An unused lot next to St. Albans, the garden is a venture to provide a sense of neighborhood, a pulling together of city farmers with a practical ending of providing vegetables to the member farmers and to El Cajon’s refugee population.

“As a church we wanted to adopt our neighborhood,” said Locke, “The garden was part of our commitment to do this.”

A number of the gardeners are Iraqi refugees who Locke said plant slightly different vegetables besides just tomatoes and corn.

“They have planted watermelons, grapes, and peas,” he said.
Circle Community Garden has 24 planting boxes. Purchasing boxes via memberships cover the plot expenses.

With a core group, members from each church teach beginning “green thumb” farmers tricks of the trade all the way up to experienced green thumbs.

Hurt said that currently some boxes also have a perky collection of flowers with marigolds being a popular flower.

Locke said the fruits of the labor, the harvest, will be continual depend on the maturing of the various vegetables and fruits but the churches do plan a get-together later on to celebrate the project.
Hurt said that boxes or larger, in ground plots, are still available for purchase. To become a part of the community garden contact the First Presbyterian Church.

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