El Cajon, CA
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Articles by Mary York

Making successful education a reality to many students means providing financial support and Cal Coast Cares Foundation has developed a scholarship and grant program for just that.

Last year, Steele Canyon Cougar Karsyn Swift and West Hills Wolfpacker Sharayah Moore were both awarded $1,000 scholarships for their collegiate pursuits. 

Moore said the scholarship was pivotal in her decision to attend Azusa Pacific University this year. 

The Highlanders are in a good place right now: undefeated, that is. 

The real test of competence comes on Wednesday, Mar. 15, when Helix girls lacrosse plays rival team Granite Hills. The Eagles (5-0) are also undefeated, so the match at Helix promises to be a heartbreaking one for at least one team. 

am a product of community college. 

Life is not fair. Most of us learn this early. 

But most people would agree that a good society will do its best to provide equitable opportunities for its youth, not favoring one group at the expense of the other. 

The Courtyard Marriott has opened its doors off El Cajon’s Magnolia Avenue, and East County may never be the same. 

The first four-star hotel to grace the area, the Marriott has been a long time in coming, said El Cajon Mayor Bill Wells during the ribbon cutting ceremony on Monday, Mar. 5.

East County was well represented in the final showdown of CIF basketball. Mount Miguel High School, Spring Valley, and Christian High School, El Cajon, sent both their boys and girls teams to the championship games.

Mount Miguel’s girls (No. 2) brought home the Open Division championship with a gut-wrenching 50-49 win against Mission Hills (No. 4).

After a three-year legal battle and two decades of effort to build a high school for Alpine students, the Grossmont Union High School District (GUHSD) and Alpine Union School District (AUSD), in conjunction with the Alpine Taxpayers for Bond Accountability (ATBA), have dropped litigation. No high school will be built in the foreseeable future. 

The first story I ever covered for The East County Californian was a boys water polo game. It was a warm evening in September of 2015 and I had never been as far east as El Capitan High School where the game was being played.

I was born and raised in the South Bay. I took ballet lessons at the civic center in Chula Vista, went to church in Bonita, attended Southwestern College for both of my associate degrees. Whatever lay east of the I-25 was largely uncharted territory for me when the then-editor of The Cal, Albert Fulcher, asked me to help cover sports in East County.

At 3:30 a.m. one morning in October of 2007, Donna Perry woke up to a hundred foot wall of fire. In the flurried scramble to evacuate, the confounding question became: what to do with the horses.

After getting her own horses to safety, Perry said she and a few others went back to take care of her neighbors ponies who refused to be moved to safety.

The terrifying experience, followed by several long days at the Lakeside Rodeo where most local livestock are taken during fires, put into sharp focus the question of equine emergency response.

In January, the high hopes of El Capitan’s all-underclassmen varsity girls basketball team were only a glimmer on the horizon. The dream arrived sooner than expected.

Entirely staffed with freshmen and sophomores -- and one lone junior who is a foreign exchange student -- the Vaqueros tampered their expectations for the season. That was before they went undefeated in league, before they earned a place in semifinals.